See Mumford & Sons at the GOTR Stopover in Aviemore, Scotland with Ben Howard, Primal Scream + More

Book Club… Narziss and Goldmund and The Pearl

Dear Friends,

Well I feel like a bit of a fool for not responding to the hoards of messages that y’all have kindly taken the time to post up here. I’m not a facebook or a twitter dude, and most of my time spent on the internet is saved exclusively for following AFC Wimbledon in the English Football League, or else watching Youtube videos of Johnny Flynn again. And again. And also reading but not really replying to emails, to my shame (“sssssorry about that”).

Meanwhile, I thought it was high time to publish another book report (NOT a book review – “I am no prophet, and here’s no great matter…”), and this time it is the long awaited Narziss and Goldmund, by Hermann Hesse, that features alongside The Pearl by John Steinbeck cos it’s high time we gave that fella a bit more love.

It was our fine banjo player Win, aka The Dowggefather, aka Duh Dowgge, aka Tres Sikh, aka Country Winston, who forced me to read the Hesse. And I won’t lie, it has taken a long time to conjure the courage and headspace both to finish and write something about N&G. It’s dense, that’s for certain. And though not the longest book ever (I confess to being one of those people who picks up a book and at least notes the number of pages presented to me as a reader), it’s meaty and it’s challenging. Upon finishing it, I can’t deny the bitter sweet taste that it leaves me with, and I’m not even sure if I can say for certain that I loved it. I can certainly say that I’m glad I read it, and that it made me think the most of any book I’ve read in the past year. But it was also the kind of book that would take me about 30 minutes to get through and make notes on just one page, and the kind of book that I would pick up, read ten pages, and then put down for a few weeks and pick up something lighter to fill in the time. Like watching a really intense film on the plane, and then compensating by watching a trashy comedy immediately afterwards. I’m grateful for both to be honest.

But the way in which Hesse explores this man, Goldmund, his character, his journey, his mistakes made out of nature and nurture, and his relationship with the sort of heroic figure of his friend and mentor Narziss is amazing. The story centres around Goldmund, who is Narziss’s pupil at a medieval monastery in Germany, and who leaves his sheltered life to “plunge into a sea of blood and lust” in his dangerous adventures on the road, and tries to make sense of the physical world around him against the backdrop of the philosophical world he’s come from. Without giving too much away, he quits his life of structured prayer and sacred safety to go a-whoring and a-stealing, and most of the book is about his exploration of the benefits and dangers of living a lawless lifestyle. Hesse takes the opportunity to really focus in on the dichotomy between a free life and a structured life, and between the artist’s and the philosopher’s way of seeking meaning in life. All pretty, pretty big themes, yes. But it’s done beautifully, and a lot of the meat of the text comes from the storyline, descriptions of Goldmund’s actions and choices, and from his conversations with Narziss, which are truly brilliantly written, in my opinion. I guess it verges a lot on the philosophical and spiritual as well as the corporeal, which is challenging for someone more simple-minded like myself, but it really is worth it, I think.

If you’re looking for light relief (relatively!), then The Pearl by John Steinbeck is that kind of book that you can smash through in an afternoon. It is so freaking beautiful. If you’ve read Steinbeck before, I think this book displays some of his quintessential skills in a really concise, direct, unassuming little story. It is painfully aware and emotive writing about human beings, community and man’s most basic nature. Kino is a Mexican pearl diver from a poor community in Baja California where he lives in a hut with his wife, Juana, and their baby son Coyotito. Kino discovers the priceless ‘pearl of the world’ when diving for pearls one day, and the story is about how The Pearl changes this poor family’s life. They try to sell it, and all the wealthy city-dwellers try to cheat them. I don’t want to say any more – all I can say is read it, if you can. It’s beautiful in every way. There is hardly any dialogue, and Steinbeck uses a soundtrack in Kino’s imagination to do a lot of the story-telling: there is a Song of the Family, which is soft and tender and ancient music in Kino’s head, and there is the Song of the Enemy which he hears when he and his family are threatened. It’s an amazingly powerful device. I don’t know if this is the kind of book they teach in schools in America, we studied Of Mice and Men at school, but this book is so concise and spot-on that it really displays Steinbeck’s ability to cut through to the core of human nature in his writing, and his exploration of injustice, greed and poverty/wealth is mind-blowingly stirring and direct. His self-control as a writer (despite his obviously more expansive books like East of Eden and Grapes of Wrath) to be able to have a huge emotional effect on a reader with so few words makes him still my favourite writer I think.

M

149 comments

  1. Mumfordlover56 says:

    Hello Marcus,
    The pearl by john steinbeck reminded me of The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway. If you havent read it yet, you should its a good book and not a long book so you’d probably finish in no time.
    A fan of your guys music, Rosie (;

  2. Cassia7 says:

    Marcus,
    I’ve written something here more than once, and it was long, perfect and just what needed to be said. But of course I forgot to log in before I submitted, so it was deleted. So I’m just going to have to sum it all up:
    I always wanted to pick up a Steinbeck or a Shakespeare, but if you asked any of my family they would say so because I’ve never really put it out there before. In school here in the States, well at least at my school, they aren’t much teaching them anymore I don’t THINK. And me, being also one of those people that can’t make it to the tenth page of a book with out a break, I figured I’d never be able to finish a book of such caliber. But since I want to be a musician when I get out of school, I’ve been looking for a little inspiration, other than the you guys, the fantastic four, lighting a fire under me to get my musical blood burning that my parents have so kindly past on to me. So this whole this is me just pretty much saying “Thanks for putting your words out there for people to see it. I’ve finally decided to pick up the book.”
    But really. Thank you.
    -Cassia

  3. Cassia7 says:

    Marcus,
    You would think that here in America they would teach us that book, but the chances are looking pretty sad and dull. Growing up to this point, I was always curious about reading Steinbeck, or Shakespeare even (but don’t hold me too it, I never much told or talked about my curious reading iches, and if you asked anyone as far as they’d know I don’t like to read and I don’t like to read because school mostly only makes us read non-fiction which is a total drag… not that your going to read this anyway. But it’s a nice thought.) ALL AND ALL, though hearing a lot of great things about their work, I never thought to well “waste me time” because I’m also one of those people that can’t read a book past the tenth page without a break, but most times, I don’t pick it back up. So I never bothered with starting. BUT I’d have to say you’ve turned me around. I want to be a musician after I’m done schooling, but it’s hard to find inspiration at school or at home, and after see and hearing how their work has inspired you, I think I can get some from their work as well. Of course, other than the impact and fire you’ve lite under me to get my musical blood burning, since my parents have past a lot of their talent on to me. So I guess this whole big thing is just another “Thanks for putting your words out there for all us to see” and “Thank you so much for what you do” from me. But really. Thank You :)
    Cassia

  4. Diana 1 says:

    hello! Narziss and goldmund is something heavy (obviously not if you like to read) but worth it, donot you but Narziss wish it appeared more to the story. ;-))))))))))

  5. Diana 1 says:

    hello! Narziss and goldmund is something heavy (obviously not if you like to read) but worth it, donot you but Narziss wish it appeared more to the story. ;-)

  6. luciapinon says:

    Nuts. Just nuts!

  7. JaceeEngels says:

    Hello, again, to my four favorite men:
    I am very hopeful that my letter/blog post found all of you well and in good health (especially you, T-Bear!). I am also very sad to hear of your tour cancellations for all of the other true Mumford & Sons aficionados out there; however, I am immensely grateful to have been able to see you in Austin. I know that your decision was wise and for the betterment of Ted’s health (yet another reason I have nothing but vast respect, appreciation, and love for you guys). Since my return to North Dakota from Austin, my summer has consisted of play practice and rehearsals, and listening to ALL things Mumford & Sons (music, albums, interviews, music videos, etc…). You are all so jolly and goodhearted, and you never fail in brightening my day. I absolutely love how you don’t take anything (especially interviews) too seriously. It is so refreshing and hilarious. Also since my return, I have been noticing the extensive beauty of my part of North Dakota a bit more keenly than usual. It has rained here abundantly, and everything is greener and fresher. I believe I read somewhere that you, Marcus, have quite an interest in agriculture (maybe that was sarcasm)? If so, I believe my small town farming community is just the place for you all to come and visit. My father is what I like to call “The world’s greatest and most dedicated farmer,” as were my grandparents and my parent’s grandparents generations before. The place where I live has every desired element: seclusion, wildlife, horses, greenery, farmland, railroad tracks (RIGHT next to our home, might I add), and simplicity. Again, this is a ridiculous request/offer, but you are all welcome to our home anytime. Ben once said something along the lines of if you’re invited to a “party,” you should go for the opportunity and experience (how very Steinbeck of him!). I know you are a fan of Steinbeck’s works, and I think you would find the general atmosphere here to be quite reminiscent. I have been thinking a LOT lately, “Wow, Marcus, Ted, Winston, and Ben would love it here.” So this is my “invitation.” I think you like to consider those who share a love for your music as friends, not “fans.” So as your friend, here is my simple “invitation.” I wish you all the best, a safe and steady recovery for Ted, and the least amount of stress possible in this situation.
    With all the love in my heart,
    Jacee Engels

  8. JaceeEngels says:

    Hello, again, to my four favorite men:
    I am very hopeful that my letter/blog post found all of you well and in good health (especially you, T-Bear!). I am also very sad to hear of your tour cancellations for all of the other true Mumford & Sons aficionados out there; however, I am immensely grateful to have been able to see you in Austin. I know that your decision was wise and for the betterment of Ted’s health (yet another reason I have nothing but vast respect, appreciation, and love for you guys). Since my return to North Dakota from Austin, my summer has consisted of play practice and rehearsals, and listening to ALL things Mumford & Sons (music, albums, interviews, music videos, etc…). You are all so jolly and goodhearted, and you never fail in brightening my day. I absolutely love how you don’t take anything (especially interviews) too seriously. It is so refreshing and hilarious. Also since my return, I have been noticing the extensive beauty of my part of North Dakota a bit more keenly than usual. It has rained here abundantly, and everything is greener and fresher. I believe I read somewhere that you, Marcus, have quite an interest in agriculture (maybe that was sarcasm)? If so, I believe my small town farming community is just the place for you all to come and visit. My father is what I like to call “The world’s greatest and most dedicated farmer,” as were my grandparents and my parent’s grandparents generations before. The place where I live has every desired element: seclusion, wildlife, horses, greenery, farmland, railroad tracks (RIGHT next to our home, might I add), and simplicity. Again, this is a ridiculous request/offer, but you are all welcome to our home anytime. Ben once said something along the lines of if you’re invited to a “party,” you should go for the opportunity and experience (how very Steinbeck of him!). I know you are a fan of Steinbeck’s works, and I think you would find the general atmosphere here to be quite reminiscent. I have been thinking a LOT lately, “Wow, Marcus, Ted, Winston, and Ben would love it here.” So this is my “invitation.” I think you like to consider those who share a love for your music as friends, not “fans.” So as your friend, here is my simple “invitation.” I wish you all the best, a safe and steady recovery for Ted, and the least amount of stress possible in this situation.

    With all the love in my heart,

    Jacee Engels

  9. JaceeEngels says:

    I hope you all received my letter/blog post, and it found you well and in good health (especially you, T-Bear!)! Ever since the live show, my summer has consisted of play practice and rehearsals, and listening to your albums, watching hilarious interviews, and reading more about you: every single one of which grows my extreme love and appreciation for you all. You’re all so jolly and do not take anything too seriously. I love it, and I love you guys. I came across something along the lines of you being into agriculture, Marcus, and interestingly enough, I’m from a VERY agricultural/farming community. My father is what I like to call “The world’s best and most dedicated farmer,” as were my grandparents generations before. I have been noticing the vast beauty of our land recently (it has rained a LOT, and everything is green) and think you would all LOVE it here. It has every element: seclusion (slightly out of town, but not too far), farmland, railroad tracks RIGHT next to our house, wildlife, greenery, horses, animals, hay… I have gathered that you are all VERY down-to-earth, and I seriously think you would love it here. Again, this is a ridiculous request and offer, but you are all welcome here anytime. Ben once said that if you’re invited to a “party” somewhere, you should go, because it is an opportunity and a journey (very Steinbeck of him). I know you love Steinbeck’s works, and I think you would see many correlations here in my town in North Dakota of both his vivid descriptions and the general way of life of the people.
    With all the love in my heart,
    Jacee Engels

  10. Mr Peskett says:

    Hey Marcus. Do you remember Mr & Mrs Peskett? We’re in LA, I’m training to be a pastor. CFYS. Get in touch if you want…

  11. Hopelesswanderer16 says:

    Marcus, what’s your favorite Steinbeck book? I don’t know which of his books to read first!

  12. kathleen1953mc says:

    Hello Marcus, You know it’s been awhile since you posted a message. Read any good books recently? Im an avid reader. Always looking for an interesting read.Your Berkeley USA concerts were awesome. Hope you come back to the Greek theater. What a great venue. Thanks for the great music.

  13. JaceeEngels says:

    I want to add that I deeply esteem your literary devices within your songs, namely on “Sigh No More.” You have once again revived and refreshed this world with meaningful lyrics. I thank you for that. More than anything on this letter, I ask that what you take away from this is my sincere gratitude. Thank you for the blessing that is your music. Thank you for instilling in me values and beauty and truth that I could not have found elsewhere. Your music has set me free and endowed within me an indescribable love and joy for life. At the ripe age of 17, I am so fortunate to say that I have grown up with truly wondrous, meaningful, wholesome music. I hope one day to see you again, and maybe even meet you all.

    Until then, with all the love in my heart and light in my spirit,

    Jacee Engels

  14. JaceeEngels says:

    I’m not sure if any of you will see this, but it is most certainly worth a shot. I don’t know how or where to begin, but here goes:
    My name is Jacee, and I’m from a small town in North Dakota. I cannot begin to describe in words the way that your music has moved me throughout the years. I bought “Sigh No More” in 2011 when it came out, and listened to it every single day for the entire summer in my Buick (my friends tend to get annoyed with me, because there is always one of your two albums that I own blasting in my car.). Music is a very large part of my life, and I love all of its forms (everywhere from jazz to Bob Dylan to Birdy.). However, the very first time I listened through “Sigh No More,” my life and appreciation for music was forever changed. I had never listened to an artist(s) who could manage to pull every single emotion my body could offer out of me, but the perfection of your four voices blending and the meaningful depth behind the lyrics certainly had managed to do so. Until the release of the deluxe “Babel” album, the “Sigh No More” CD was all that I listened to, besides your EP soundtracks I could find on YouTube. Again, when I first listened to “Babel,” I was connected to on a level and intensity never felt before. To this day, one of two of your albums are always playing (mostly blaring) in my car. My father and I had discussed previously about maybe one day making it to a live show. Little did I know that dream would become a reality in just a few short years. Just Saturday, June 8, I was able to see my very first Mumford & Sons live concert in Austin, Texas at the Austin360 Amphitheater. Between my father, sister, and a LOT of beautiful luck, they managed to access 3 general pit tickets. I know you are a very humble group of men, but I am somewhat of a crazed fan. I can’t tell you your birthdays or recite every bit of factual information about each of you that there is, but that is okay, I think. The way your music reaches me speaks every kind of truth I need. When I was going through some of the most trialing times in my life, there was your music right alongside me, and in part, you four men by my side to comfort me and equip me with the strength I needed to persist. The very moment I saw you perform live was perhaps the most monumental occurrence in my life thus far. I want to add that you placing Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m on Fire” in your set list was pure evidence that I was supposed to see you on this tour. Not only do I love the song, my parents hold the song very dear to their hearts, as it was “their love song” as a young couple. Everything about the concert was exquisite and perfect. Everything felt insignificant next to those few hours I was able to share with you. I didn’t manage to catch a drumstick, or a set list, or a used towel, but I did manage to catch something inevitable: the incandescent happiness that your music has brought me so many years (only, times infinity.). I have developed quite an infatuation for your keyboardist, Mr. Ben Lovett (I too was a keyboardist/harmonizer in a band, and I feel like Ben and I are practically the same person, but I’m getting ahead of myself.). I wrote you a letter the night before the concert in my hotel, hoping that with another dose of immense luck and great fortune, it would somehow make its way to one of you, or, better yet, all of you. Although I tried, I could not get it passed on to you, so I left it on the floor of the amphitheater, thinking that maybe it would blow away to your tour bus (or something like that.). A guard suggested to me while I was weeping, “Just write it to them on their fan page.” So this blog post is a summation of just about everything in the letter, but more, because I now have the grace of seeing you live fresh in my mind. Again, I know you are all very humble and want to remain true to who you are as both individuals and as a band, therefore communication is mostly done through your music. I really appreciate that you aren’t all “tweeting” everything and making your daily lives an easy access to us grueling fans (although, I wouldn’t complain about it for a second, either.). I really hoped my handwritten letter would make it to you. It was more raw and more me. You see, I really, REALLY want you all to know me. It was my dream to see you live, and that was achieved, but it is also a “SUPER dream” of mine to have a total jam session with you and get to know one another. Either that, or becoming a roadie and touring everywhere with you guys (it’s all farfetched, but what is life without mad, wild dreams?). I do trust that if this letter is meant to find you, it will.

  15. tifftiffhooray says:

    Hello. It seems you have not posted a report about a book in a while. I do hope that you have still been reading. I imagine it is tough getting online when you are making fabulous music and pleasing your fans with sounds of pure awesomeness. Thanks for sharing about your previous books. Some I have read, many I have not. Perhaps you would be interested in keeping track of books and read other reviews/ reports from readers around the world on http://www.goodreads.com I go here often to hear of any old and new books that are must reads. Best wishes to you and the band! Amazing job at San Manuel Amphitheater in San Bernardino, CA! Come back any time!

  16. Crispy Bubbles says:

    Gonna go find N&G, and read it the whole summer, and try and hit The Pearl after that. Good recommendation by the way. Thanks

  17. I’ve always loved Hesse, but never got around to N&G but as i am finishing my most recent one “If on a winters night a traveler” by Italo Calvino, great book by the way, i believe i will read the Hesse novel next. Thanks Marcus and i agree with the comment below, you are a true and amazing artist. Loved the concert Sunday by the way.

  18. Crispy Bubbles says:

    Hi, I just joined the book club and I kinda read books… Lol im bad at setting myself but um. I dont know the “book world” and would like some suggestions of books to read. Thanks and Marcus you are a true artist ^_^!

  19. mtbwbable says:

    Marcus, I know you have know idea of who i am but i think you might enjoy reading travels with charley. It too is by Steinbeck. it is rather a good deal more light hearted than the pearl but it is fun and whitty

  20. AndreaMarks says:

    You might like “Song of Achilles”. Beautiful writing. Happy reading! :o)

  21. Denius says:

    Many times I have written on their website but I never tire of it, although I really do not read hahaha.
    I want to congratulate you for your work really are incredible, ever since I first heard I fell in love with the lyrics of the songs and of course of its rhythm, melody of which each of you is indispensable.
    They are so sensitive like me and that’s what I like about you, are so magical. At the time of listening is as if out of my body and I were in a bubble elevating over the world, and thanks for that.
    I can only tell them to come to my country Chile as they have many fans and the public believe me somo more faithful and more magical at concerts
    I love you guys and I hope you continue to create this wonder called MUMFORD AND SONS

  22. LoveroftheLight19 says:

    Oh and I forgot to say! COME TO INDIANA!!!

  23. LoveroftheLight19 says:

    I just checked The Pearl and many other Steinbeck books out of the library because of your influence,Marcus. So far I am really enjoying the pearl so thank you. And of course I must express my sincere gratitude for your beautiful and life changing music!
    -SCZ

  24. Cowbous and karma says:

    If I can suggest a book I think horse soliders is great

  25. samanthaann says:

    Hello Marcus, fellow posters & welcome back Annie! Really lovely to hear from you again! Glad all’s well with you. Hope your husband’s on the mend.
    Well, Room didn’t turn out to be quite the awful read I was expecting. I’ve about 30 pages left. It isn’t a pleasant situation but they do escape & it doesn’t involve child abuse. It’s an interesting perspective of the world as seen by a very innocent 5 year old. Believe it or not, it does have humourous bits! If you persevere you do get through the bleaker start to the brighter ending! God Bless, SamanthaAnn xxxx

  26. brandi21150 says:

    The bands lyrics always move me. And no matter how many times I listen to your songs over and over, I always find a new phrase or a new feeling to appreciate in a different way. So I will predict you guys will be timeless in this world of music. I want to recommend a book…One Thousand Gifts by Ann Voskamp. Surely not Steinbeck or Camus, but poetry that you will appreciate, I am sure. :)

  27. rochford says:

    Hello SamanthaAnn ,it’s me Annie back at last ! Not dead yet! Hubby been poorly so a bit tied up. Still listening and reading, I have just finished Mrs Robinson’s Disgrace a factual book about a notorious Victorian divorce case that used a woman;s diaries, which may have been fantasy as evidence. Insight into repressive laws of that time when we were no more than goods or chattels with no rights at all,be glad to live now! Hope to be back in the fold and welcome to new members Annie xxxx

  28. J Corley Ackley says:

    Hmmm, it’s me again. I am truly hoping my little shop of horrors greenhouses don’t eat me before your Taos show as I was fortunate enough to win the lottery for tickets. If you see a decrepit old woman in a power wheelchair, you will know the plants spared me!!!

  29. J Corley Ackley says:

    As an English major and a devoted fan of Steinbeck, it is truly embarrassing to admit I never read “East of Eden”–everything else he wrote, though. So, thanks to you I am getting ready to tackle it. Loving Steinbeck, I can only imagine I will love it, and I do love a meaty read. And, yes. Steinbeck was a must read in the schools I attended in the states. I agree with absolutely everything you have said about “The Pearl” by the by. I do have a problem with reading right now as I either cannot keep the buds to my I-Pod out of my ears (2 albums in particular) or else I cannot turn off the DVD of “Road to Red Rocks”. I even have a stereo in one of my greenhouses (organic/heirloom farmer) in which I repeatedly play both your albums. Good God!!! It looks like the “Little Shop of Horrors” this year! It has got to be the best music around that is just awakening their growth hormones beyond the imaginable.

  30. samanthaann says:

    Hello again Marcus & fellow literature enjoyers! Well I’m Reading Room by Emma Donaghue for my library book group. I can only say it’s not a comfortable read. It features a 5 yr old boy who has only ever lived in a small room with his mum, visited by a sinister man who delivers groceries & stays the night with his mum, known as Old Nick. I would never have chosen to read this, although the cover notes sound intriguing. I have a rule to never not finish a book so I will stick with it. Sometimes reading can be uncomfortable but then we can’t pretend life is all roses. Not exactly a recommendation, just as update on what I’m reading, really. Take care & enjoy the Bank Hol in the UK! I will! God Bless, SamanthaAnn xxxx

  31. merrieheather says:

    Hello, All. Just now joining in 2013, though I’ve been listening since one of your first times played on KGSR in Austin. I just commented on your Cormac McCarthy post and realized I was a few years behind. Oops. No matter. I’m jumping in at Steinbeck. No better place to start, in my estimation. I taught freshman and senior literature for eleven years in American public schools and I’m proud to say that Steinbeck was a student favorite every single year. “The Pearl” and “Of Mice and Men” touch who we are at every age. My hasband and I will have our hands in the air with you on a Sunday in June in Austin. Every day my spirit soars as I listen to your brilliant, spirit-filled lyrics and literally stomp my foot (not the one on the gas) as I drive about the Texas hill country doing my work for a local hospice. Thank you for being you and for sharing your light.

  32. samanthaann says:

    Hello Marcus & all the people who have taken the time to post. It’s great to have all this bookchat. Now, I finished The Tenderness Of Wolves, Steph Penney. I think it was an absolute gripping read. Set in Canada in the 1860s it’s a kind of whodunnit in the wilderness, with twists & lots of beautiful landscape description that isn’t at all monotonous. It features native Indian characters, which ties in nicely with our early factual read Bury My Heart….. I was really surprised at my reaction as I hadn’t anticipated even liking it that much, but I did. The lead lady in it is a really gutsy lady, which I appreciated. I found I truly didn’t want to put it down. My only criticism is I would have liked maybe another 50 pages to see the story move on but you never know. Room for a sequel! God Bless, SamanthaAnn xxxx

  33. Hannah :D says:

    Me again :D I’m still sticking with my recomondation of Rockbound, but in an earlier post I heard you were thinking of reading The Book Theif, and I was wondering if you ever did? You really should; it is quite something.

  34. tigermom says:

    I may have been 20 when i read “A prayer for Owen Meany” by John Irving. Good Book. I did not know if i could still fall in love until i heard the music you make & now i feel 20 all over again. Reality and limitations be gone. I will be at the gates of that stopover and allow the light to shine. My eyes will be closed, my ears will be open and my soul shall soar. There is no doubt tears shall spill down my cheeks. Perhaps no tix will grace our clumsy confused hands so play very loudly please because this love is worth living for and sound travels far beyond those gates so we will be there & tix brokers be damned. Listen and look for the faintest whisper of light in the darkest situations. Follow that idea of light and it will lead you home to your love. We love your luminescence and may we all shine bright!

  35. Hannah :D says:

    Hi Marcus, thanks for the reviews (opps I mean reports haha :D). You should consider reading Rockbound by Frank Parker Day, just an idea, but it’s truly an amazing book. Also I just want to say thank-you for sharing your amazing music with the world; it is beautiful and inspiring. Please come to Ottawa soon, boys! I’ve been keeping my fingers crossed ever since Sigh No More was released :D

  36. Terry Scard says:

    Hi Marcus

    Always good to hear your views. Would just like to recommend you read the writings of Simone Weil. They will make you think and hurt your brain ! Keep writing with your “heart on your sleeve”. Regards Terry

  37. M-POY says:

    Hello Marcus and the rest of the gang I am not at all technical but have registered YAY. I have booked tickets for my daughter (who is your biggest fan) and myself at Lewes 19-20 July 2013 and we cannot wait to see you all there. Unfortunately my daughter Blaithin, who is 13 was diagnosed with alopecia areta yesterday and is very upset about her condition. As a surprise to try and cheer her up I have bought her tickets to see you all at Olympic Park on Sat 6th July. I gave her the tickets last night and she was ecstatic she cannot believe she will be seeing you twice within a few weeks. What I would really like would be if you had the time on either one of those dates to possibly spare 2 minutes of your time just to say hello to her. I know it is a lot to ask from you but if you could manage a few minutes to meet her she would be the happiest girl on earth. From a mum who wants to cheer her daughter up and make one of her dreams come true and who will probably get told of for embarrassing her daughter by posting a blog. XXXXXX

  38. proulcj says:

    Hi. My name is Jonah and I a m 10 years old. I live in New Hampshire and you have been my favorite band since I was 8. I saw you when you were in Portland Maine. You were awesome. I have just started learning piano so that I can play your songs. I was able to figure out how to play part of The Cave before I started lessons because I listened to the cd so much. I want to see you live again and meet you. I want to be a musician someday because of your music. Thank you Jonah Ps you guys are wicked awesome. Thank you

  39. jessamaybe7 says:

    The Pearl was one of those books that has stuck with me since childhood. Steinbeck is a man who was able to speak to someone of any age. I read the book with my own children and they still remember and bring it up once in awhile. We read quite a bit, but there is something very worthy about that little book!

  40. mbonady says:

    Hi Marcus and all, I love this book club! I just put out my first novel, which is free right now for Kindle… I’d love for anyone here to download a copy and let me know what you think. Large portions of my novel were written with Mumford as the soundtrack :)
    Here’s the link if you’re interested : http://www.amazon.com/A-Butterfly-Came-Rest-ebook/dp/B00BY85ZXO

    It’s a travel story / coming of age tale about discovery, loss, regret, and hope. Hope you like it!

  41. leahem says:

    If you haven’t read Franny and Zooey by JD Salinger I highly recommend it.

  42. Steinbeck breaks my heart with every book but has a definite perspective on the human condition. East of Eden is still my favorite because after ripping your heart out, he gives hope in the last sentence.

  43. Mike4ebooks says:

    Checkout Mumfordbooks-guides.com we are a hyperspace internet family book business, established in 1999. Doing are best to deliver knowledge and enjoyment, accessed and downloaded eBooks at the speed of light.
    We use images to say more with less. All my adult life I have been put off by books written without a single image to focus on. Being an average type of person I am switched on by quality images shown in an honest and logical way. Every day I learn something new.

  44. samanthaann says:

    Happy Easter to you, boys & to all who visit this site & support the boys. I wish you a happy & peaceful one & let’s have some Spring in the UK! God Bless, SamanthaAnnxxxx

  45. arianavega says:

    I would love to hear what you would have to say about “The Catcher In The Rye” It’s my favorite and you could probably get through it in one sitting.

  46. Kala & Justin Decker says:

    Me and my hubby fell in love with the M&S as soon as i heard the cave and will support you all no matter what. even though i really don’t know about the rap stage but no worries we will listen. we listen every day and every time we listen the lyrics goes right to the heart . love you guys keep up the wonderful work. with love from ( USA) Maine